Redistribution of intracellular and extracellular free & adsorbed antibiotic resistance genes through a wastewater treatment plant by an enhanced extracellular DNA extraction method with magnetic beads.

Redistribution of intracellular and extracellular free & adsorbed antibiotic resistance genes through a wastewater treatment plant by an enhanced extracellular DNA extraction method with magnetic beads.

Because of the limitations of the current extraction method, extracellular DNA (EDNA) is rarely seen from intracellular DNA (IDNA) even though it has a unique contribution to the propagation of antibiotic resistance genes (args).

Furthermore, Edna may be free (F-edna) or absorbed into or suspend solids, including cells (A-edna), which affects the persistence and transmission arg. We developed the novel method using magnetic beads to separate IDNA, A-Edna, and F-Edna to assess how the physical condition of this args changed in wastewater treatment plants.

This method extracts EDNA efficiently (> 85.3%) with a higher recovery than the current method such as alcohol precipitation, CTAB-based extraction, and DNA extraction kit (<10%). Biological care and UV disinfection reduce the concentration of intracellular args (IARGS) and extracellular args delivered (a-eargs), causing an increase in free extracellular args released (F-eargs).

More args are thrown through wasted biosolids rather than in waste; IARGS and A-EARG prevalued in the wasted biosolid ((73.9 ± 22.5)% and (23.4 ± 15.3)% of their respective total args), while F-EARG is prevalent in EFLUEN ((90 , 3 ± 16.5)%). Bacterial Community Analysis shows a significant correlation between genera and specific args (eg, aeromonas, pseudomonas and acinetobacter highly correlated with blatem gene resistance multidrug). This treatment system reduces the release of the iArgs to the recipient’s environment, however, an increase in EARG concentration is present in waste, which can contribute to environmental resistance.

Extraction of DNA plants with microneedle patches for rapid detection of plant diseases.

The diagnosis of molecules in the field of plant diseases through nucleic acid amplification is currently limited by the complicated protocol to extract and isolate pathogenous DNA from plant tissue. To overcome this challenge, the Plant DNA extraction method is rapidly developed using disposable microneedle polymer patches (MN). By applying mn patches on plant leaves, DNA amplification-test ready can be extracted in one minute of different plant species.

DNA extracted by MN is used for the amplification of the polymerase chain reaction directly from DNA plastid plants without purification. In addition, using this patch device, extraction of Plant pathogen DNA (phytophora infestans) from leaf samples inoculated laboratory and infected field is carried out for detection of rotten disease in tomatoes.

The MN extraction reached the level of detection of 100% of the end of the infection of the end of the sample after 3 days of inoculation when compared to conventional gold standards of Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTAB) extraction methods based and 100% detection rate for all samples of blind fields was tested. This simple, free-lyed and free purification extraction method can be a transformative approach to facilitate fast sample preparation for the molecular diagnosis of various plant diseases directly in the field.

Extraction of ancient DNA from the remaining plants.

The remaining ancient plants of the archaeological site, paleoenvironmental context, and herbaria provides an excellent opportunity to interrogate plant genetics during the quarter time scale using ancient DNA (ADNA) analysis. Various plant tissue, mainly conserved by drying and anaerobic puddles, has proven to be a decent ADNA source.

The plant tissue diverse anatomically and chemically and therefore requires an optimized DNA extraction approach. Here, we describe the insulation protocol DNA plants that perform well in many contexts. We include recommendations for optimization to maintain very short DNA fragments that are expected to be preserved in degraded tissue.

Redistribution of intracellular and extracellular free & adsorbed antibiotic resistance genes through a wastewater treatment plant by an enhanced extracellular DNA extraction method with magnetic beads.

Easy and efficient DNA extraction of wood plants for phytoplasm detection with a polymerase chain reaction.

Simple and efficient procedures for high-quality DNA extraction from wood and herbs infected with phytoplasm for detection of polymerase chain reactions (PCR) are explained. This procedure does not require phenol, chloroform, or alcohol for nucleic acid precipitation. Herbal and wood plants are extracted identical without additional purification or enrichment steps needed.

This method utilizes a commercially available microspin column matrix, and total DNA extraction can be achieved in less than 1 hour. This method has been used to successfully purify the Phytoplasma DNA from all leaves, leaf leaves and midrib, roots, and inactive wood from various choices of plant material. Phytoplasmas detected by PCR include a decrease in pears, Western X-disease, yellow leaf rolls, rosette peaches, apples proliferation, Australian wine yellow, and vaccine brooms.

The high-performance throughput method is easy to extract the DNA plant genome.

DNA Generom isolation is an important technique for researchers who study molecular biology of plants. The protocol that is widely used today for DNA extraction requires Alu and Fana for each sample and consumes a large number of liquid nitrogen in grinding samples. Most throughput methods depend on expensive machines for network homogenization.

Here we developed a CTAB-based DNA extraction method using a 2.0 mL microcentrifuge tube for sample processing. This protocol has a suitable advantage for various plants, which is easy to do without special equipment, and a high throughput; This effectively avoids samples of cross contamination, and are not expensive, fast and safe.

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